Orgasms for Women

Orgasms for Women: Everything you need to know

Sometimes it's tingling, sometimes intense and sometimes it comes in waves.  Sometimes it spreads through your whole body, while other times it's subtle. Whichever way you experience it, the female orgasm is complex – and can feel like a miracle. But what actually happens during this "miraculous" experience? Why do some people orgasm just by vaginal penetration and others with clitoral stimulation too? What tools and possibilities do you have to reach climax more regularly? Let's answer these important questions... 

First things first, if you have never experienced an orgasm, this is not unusual. Many women haven't and there can be a number of different reasons. Often it's a question of the mind and more rarely, it's due to health or physical reasons - like the mythical Dead Vagina Syndrome.

Either way, just because you've never had an orgasm doesn't mean it can't happen in the future. For example, our author Gigi Engle explains to you here how there are a number of ways for women to reach climax. You can also try sex toys. Many women that were not orgasmic before experienced their first orgasms with the Womanizer – within minutes. The Womanizer is not a conventional vibrator, but a clitoris stimulator with the unique Pleasure Air™ Technology. Gentle air vibrations surround the clitoris and guide you to orgasms – slowly or quickly, however you like it.

What is an orgasm?

Let's take a scientific approach to this. As a study from Rutgers University in Newark, New Jersey has shown, our genital regions like clitoris, vagina, cervix but also erogenous zones like nipples are connected to the parietal lobe of the cerebral cortex. Every touch to these regions sends fresh impulses to this area of the brain. If several points of the body are touched at once – for example the G-spot and clitoris, the orgasm is perceived as more intense. And vice versa.

The brain runs at full speed during an orgasm and connects areas that are otherwise separate. The cerebellum shortly before the climax has the task of tensing the muscles in your lower half. The prefrontal cortex in the frontal lobe – the control center of the brain – then triggers images. This is not unusual, since this area is responsible for planning and abstract thinking in everyday life.

But for orgasm to be achieved, one thing above all must happen and that is for certain areas of the brain to shut down – most specifically those that plan and organize. Feelings like fear and inhibitions are suppressed.  The path is cleared for exactly one sensation: lust!

What are the effects of an orgasm?

There it is! The rocket launches and your body is flooded with oxytocin. This hormone is responsible for fabulous sensations, those indescribable feelings that cannot be put into words...

What does an orgasm feel like?

It can be harder for women to recognize an orgasm as there is less obvious physical evidence. Additionally, media representations of orgasms are often over the top and more than a little exaggerated. If you're not recreating the diner scene from "When Harry Met Sally", then don't worry.

Do orgasms feel the same for everybody?

Orgasms can vary in intensity for everybody, so it's natural to feel a bit confused about whether you orgasmed or not sometimes.

Lucky for any of us still a bit unsure, there's a few obvious ways to know if you've experienced the Big O.

To a lot of people, enjoying an orgasm can feel like a release of pressure or tension. So if you have the feeling of climbing and climbing in a rollercoaster and finally dropping off the edge, that sounds a lot like you've had an orgasm.

Alternatively, orgasms can leave physical evidence in the form of released bodily fluids and even superficial signs like being out of breath or blushing.

The point is that orgasms are experienced differently for everybody, so it's fine to be really unsure of whether you've experienced one or not. Just spend some time exploring your body on your own to work out what feels good and whether these feelings escalate. And we have the perfect toys for that...

Is it difficult to have an orgasm?

There can be a few different issues with orgasming, including:

  • never orgasming at all
  • orgasming rarely
  • or even experiencing pain during an orgasm

While it's not necessary to have an orgasm to enjoy being intimate, it can become an issue for many couples. It's very common for women, who experience arousal without orgasms, to feel an ache or even a particular tension in their body. Issues with orgasms can actually affect a lot of women and there is usually a clear underlying cause.

What causes orgasm problems?

There could be a number of factors, both physical and psychological, involved with orgasm issues.Orgasm problems have been associated with a number of physical and psychological factors.

Physical factors include:

  • blood issues
  • hormonal issues
  • nerve issues
  • prescription drug side effects

Psychological factors include:

  • trauma
  • age
  • cultural/social background
  • relationship problems
  • poor communication
  • self-esteem issues

A common way of recognizing whether an issue is physical or psychological is assessing how long the issue has occurred. Sudden changes re often due to physical issues, while long-term issues are more like rooted in a psychological background.

Can you orgasm alone?

Of course! For some women, it's consistently easier to masturbate and orgasm than reach climax with a partner. And that's completely okay.

If you're wondering about how your orgasm and whether it can be more intense, take the time to relax and explore your body with a toy. Knowing your own body is a great first step to helping others understand you too.